Toilet and Toilets Reviews

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Toilet and Toilets Review

When it comes to reading about Toilet and toilets review you need to make sure and compare apples to apples and oranges to oranges. Not all toilets are created equal and the main components you want to compare will be:

  • GPS or gallons per flush
  • gravity feed versus pressurized flow
  • trapway size is critical to clean toilets
  • low profile toilets versus your traditional standard toilet
  • two piece toilets versus one piece toilets
  • ADA toilets compared to modern toilets

We pause our educational material to bring you a video that is guaranteed to make you laugh. If you don’t believe me start the toilet video:

Our primary goal is to educate the home owner on the many different types of toilet parts and toilet systems that are available to you. We have plenty of toilet reviews for you on this site so make sure and read those toilet reviews located on the right side of the page.

Since the advent of Home Depot many shoppers who look for a toilet home depot or Lowes toilets will find cheap toilets that sometimes work well and other times “not so well”. Glacier Bay Toilets are made by Home Depot and you will find all the information you need on these toilets by following that link.

Click on this link, toilet history to get an idea of how the toilet evolved over the years. Our toilets reviews will cover toilets by American Standard standard, Eljer toilets, Gerber toilets, Kohler toilets, Glacier Bay toilets by home depot, ProFlo toilets by Kohler and Toto toilets.

The information found on this page will educate you enough so that you have the toilet vocabulary down and when you do talk to people about a toilet you will know what they are talking about.

toilet reviewsDo you know what GPF is? Try gallons per flush. Do you know what an elongated one-piece toilet is? Men you should be all over this and you shouldn’t allow your wife to talk you out of one. The next time you are looking at toilets take a serious look at the bowl. Most installed toilets are usually round or oval. Elongated has a little extra room for men to not have to worry about rubbing the front of the bowl.

You have heard of a dual flush toilet, correct? Are they worth the extra cost? Are you ready to use your brush a lot more? Let’s learn:

Toilet and Toilets Quick Vocabulary Education

Traditional or modern toilets use a siphoning tube that flushes the waste into the trapway and out of the toilet. Basically they must gravity feed water down into the bowl and out the trap. The dual flush system has a bigger trapway which means less volume of water is needed to get rid of the waste. Less water means you don’t use as much and you save money. Dual flush systems are more toilet and toilets systemsexpensive, larger and if you have a habit of looking at your bowl you will not see as much water and more streaking. This streaking means you will need to use your toilet brush more often. However, with a larger trap you will not need a plunger as much.

With all the talk in the industry about how much water it takes to get your material flushed down the toilet I bet you never thought about a powerful flushing technology system to make sure it gets out of your toilet and into your system. Many new models are on the market and manufacturers pride themselves in low GPF systems. You will see 1.0 gpf or 1.25 and many more. Lower gpf means less water and again, money savings.

Ever heard of squat toilets? Only if you traveled to Asia would you know about these. I remember the first time my son saw one, he just about flipped out when I told him what it does. He quickly found out it was fun to go potty and try to hit the target.

Toilet and Toilets Advice

We recently had to rebuild our home due to a house fire. One of the contractors asked us what type of toilets or ca mode we were thinking of and we asked him for a recommendation. Obviously he stated either a elongated one-piece toilet or a two-piece elongated toilet. The difference between the two is basically a tank behind the toilet seat. However, we all know the reasons behind a elongated bowl, correct?

The other recommendation he gave us was purchasing one called a ADA compliant toilets. ADA stands for American Disabilities Act. People with disabilities request these bowls because it is much easier to use. These toilets are taller which means as we get older it is easier to sit down and stand up. You don’t drop so far down. Now that we have one, I know exactly what he was talking about. These two recommendations were “God-send” and music to our ears now. So my advice: consider both of these options. We discuss the ADA toilet reviews on a couple of other pages on the site.

Another thing we learned from our plumber was that if you truly have your eyes set on a Kohler you might want to consider Pro Flo. ProFlo is basically the same thing but much cheaper. He told us that Kohler does make ProFlo (however I can’t confirm it right now) and after looking at them we did see a small difference but not enough to warrant the extra price. We like our ProFlo toilets and we do recommend them to anyone who asks us about them.

Let’s not forget about the toilet seat. While we were shopping we came across toilet seats called: Slow Close These seats when activated towards the close they don’t flop down hard. Instead they take their sweet time to close the lid. I really liked this feature but at the price we backed down. However it does get tiring to always hear the toilet lid slam down on the toilet bowl rim.

If you do plan on replacing your own toilets (toilet installation) make sure you get a complete list of all the plumbing supplies needed to successfully install your new unit. I couldn’t believe how many different toilet parts you needed and all that it entails.

We also have rental property. And we’ve had our fair share of toilets and when you are in the rental business you want a toilet that is dependable. Yes, it is important to contribute to the ecology but at the same time you need to make sure and get that stuff out of the toilet and into your pipes so it’s out of the house. If you live in a older home it might be a good idea to change your pipes to the pvc material they use now if you are going with something like a 1.28 gpf elongated toilet. You see pressure is what will get your “stuff” out and into the pipes. Low flow systems or should I say, low gallon per flush (GPF) systems can take several flushes to get it all out.

What I like to call the “guts” of your toilet is usually found inside the water tank. You normally have a flapper that covers the hole attached to a chain that lifts the flapper once you push the left-hand trip lever to flush and then water is released into the bowl. With the lower end GPF toilets (1.0 gpf toilet to 1.25gpf) you might need a pressure-assisted toilet, which basically has air in the tank and when you flush, the pressure pushes the water forcefully into the tank and helps remove your “stuff” easily into the sewage system.

Oh, almost forgot here is a brief list of manufacturers.

  • Kohler
  • American Standard
  • Toto
  • Gerber
  • Eljer
  • ProFlo
Here is the list of toilets you can purchase:
  • Standard floor mount
  • Wall hung
  • Wall mount
  • corner mount
  • dual flush
  • single flush
  • one piece
  • two piece
  • composting toilet systems

Composting Toilets Reviews

We have read a lot of information about composting and the majority of composting toilet reviews center around people who don’tcomposting toilet reviews want to pee in their drinking water and they want to be environmentalists. Most of them are using their composting toilets either in a recreational vehicle (motor home) or they own a cabin in the woods. A lot of places require people to find alternative waste removal systems and the first place they run is online to see what type of human waste removal systems are available.

I have always ran straight to Amazon to find what other people are saying and I for one, will never pay over $1400 for a composting toilet. I’d rather find a portable camping toilet instead of trying out the composting route. If you do any searching at all you will find that composting toilets require a lot of work, are supposed to use zero water and some use peat moss or bricks or coconut fiber. However, there are some toilets that have received a pretty bad rap. I believe these reviews were written out of frustration with a certain brand of composting toilet and just for you I have included the link for you to read.

Now, with all this information in your hands you should now be able to successfully “talk shop” with any retail outlet and fix up your bathroom ca mode. To get back to the top of toilet and toilets Reviews click it.

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